Oecumene Dialogue December 2014

We are very pleased to send you the December edition of Oecumene Dialogues.

Summary of items covered in this issue:

  1. Event: Future Citizen Forum at The Tate Modern
  2. News: Transeuropa Festival publication: Engin Isin on Lampedusa
  3. News: Iker Barbero wins Adam Podgòrecki Prize 2014
  4. News: openDemocracy articles online
  5. Blog: 'Constructing democracy and deconstructing buildings: attempts at a different present and future in Bosnia' by Elena Cirkovic
  6. Publication: What's in a name? Queer Politics and Cultural Translation
  7. Publication: Citizenship and orientalism: Strategies and technologies for the governance of migrations
  8. Publication: The Routledge Handbook of Global Citizenship Studies
  9. Publication: Contemporary history of alterity in Spanish immigration law
  10. Publication: Is Torture Part of Your Social Network?
  11. Publication: Orientalism and the Politics of Contemporary Art Exhibitions
  12. Publication: ‘Where is the time to sleep?’ Orientalism and citizenship in Mahasweta Devi's writing

1. Event: Future Citizen Forum at The Tate Modern

The seminar series 'Future Citizen Forum' explored civic activism and international arts practices through the following themes: Values, Border, Affinities on 22, 29 November and 6 December 2014.

This seminar series has been developed by the Tate Modern's Community Learning and Engin Isin in response to the popular Global communities and critical citizenship programme at Tate Modern in March 2014.

http://www.oecumene.eu/events/future-citizen-forum-affinities

http://www.oecumene.eu/events/future-citizen-forum-borders

http://www.oecumene.eu/events/future-citizen-forum-values

2. News: Transeuropa Festival publication: Engin Isin on Lampedusa

'Lampedusa: A Tragedy in Four Acts' by Engin Isin is part of a publication resulting from the Transeuropa Festival which took place 4-27 October 2013. The full text article is available online.

http://www.oecumene.eu/news/transeuropa-festival-publication-engin-isin-on-lampedusa

3. News: Iker Barbero wins Adam Podgòrecki Prize 2014

The ISA Research Committee on the Sociology of Law established the Podgòrecki Prize in 2004, to honour the memory of Adam Podgòrecki, the founding father of RCSL and a leading figure within the international sociological community. A jury of RCLS, chosen by the RCSL President, awarded the prize to Iker Barbero for outstanding scholarship of a socio-legal researcher at an earlier stage of his career.

http://www.oecumene.eu/news/iker-barbero-is-winner-of-the-adam-podg%C3%B2recki-prize-2014

4.  News: openDemocracy articles online

Leticia Sabsay published an article on ‘the promise of citizenship: autonomy and abject choices’ on Open Democracy (24 March, 2014).

Andrea Mura and Dario Gentili published an article on 'The austerity of the commons: a struggle for the essential' on openDemocracy (24 February 2014).

 

5. Blog: 'Constructing democracy and deconstructing buildings: attempts at a different present and future in Bosnia'

by Elena Cirkovici

Bosnia’s widespread protests against unemployment and corruption, began in the formerly industrial town of Tuzla in early February, and spread quickly among other cities, eventually shutting down the center of Sarajevo. The general expression of the protests is that the average Bosnian citizens have had enough, and that the time has come for real change. Read more...

http://www.oecumene.eu/blog/constructing-democracy-and-deconstructing-buildings-attempts-at-a-different-present-and-future-

6. Publication: What's in a name? Queer Politics and Cultural Translation

By Leticia Sabsay

Sabsay, Leticia (2014) ‘What’s in a name? Queer Politics and Cultural Translation’ (Qué hay en un nombre? Políticas queer y traducción cultural), in B. Briones y E. Burgos (Eds.), Feminismos lesbianos y queer: Representación y políticas. México DF & Madrid: Plaza y Valdés, pp. 115-121.
 

7. Publication: Citizenship and orientalism: Strategies and technologies for the governance of migrations

By Iker Barbero

Academic and institutional discourses about the threat that immigration poses to the so-called Western rationality and democratic values are increasingly frequent.We could lavel these discourses as neo-Orientalist because of its aim to refer to the (Muslim) migrant as the savage, uncivilized, terrorist 'other', an 'anti-citizen.In this sense, this article will reflect about how citizenship, following the neo-Orientalist logic, has become a set of orinetations, discourses, practices and policies for the governance of migration.Indeed, these are the guidelines through which neoliberal globalization liberalize the free movement of citizens and «westernized» foreign persons while subject to technologies of citizenship and borders to different subjects, regarded as eternal outsiders, or even aliens, because of their incivility, hazards, ultimately, for their unintegrability. Published in Spanish in the Spanish Journal of Immigration Law, N. 36, 2014, ps. 303-321

8. Publication: The Routledge Handbook of Global Citizenship Studies

By Engin Isin and Peter Nyers

Citizenship Studies is at a crucial moment of globalizing as a field. Professors Engin Isin and Peter Nyers are editing a Handbook that will take account of this moment and set a new agenda for the field. The Handbook will provide state-of-the art analyses of the practices and enactments of citizenship across broad continental regions (Africas, Americas, Asias, Europes) as well as deterritorialized forms of citizenship (Diasporicity, Indigeneity).

Chapters include: Jack Harrington (2014) ‘Navigating Global Citizenship Studies’, in E. Isin and P. Nyers (ed), The Routledge Handbook of Global Citizenship Studies, pp. 12-19 (Routledge: London, 2014).

Sabsay, Leticia (2014) ‘Sexual Citizenship and Cultural Imperialism’, in P. Neyers and E. Isin (Eds.) Routledge Handbook of Global Citizenship Studies. London: Routledge, pp. 96-109.

http://www.oecumene.eu/publications/global-citizenship-studies

9. Publication: Contemporary history of alterity in Spanish immigration law

By Iker Barbero

Spain is one of the few countries in the European Union where Islam has had a historical role in the social and cultural construction of its identity. However, its modern history is marked by acts of repudiation of non-Christian cultures. Opinion polls indicate that certain groups of migrants from North Africa, Latin America and Eastern Europe, but mainly Muslims, are considered to be incompatible with the popular conception of Spanish identity. The reason for this perception is related to the social construction of the migrant as the 'other to govern' by political, academic and media discourses. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that immigration law also plays a fundamental role in this strategy of 'orientalization', i.e. the attribution of certain qualities to migrant groups (illegal, antisocial, criminal, unassimilable, terrorist), the aim of which is to legitimize the selective control of immigration. While meeting the guidelines provided by European authorities, the Spanish immigration and citizenship regime contributes to the construction of otherness, and therefore, to the political and legal (re)definition of what 'being Spanish' means. Published in Spanish in the Journal of political studies, N. 164 (April-June 2014), pp. 115-150.

http://www.oecumene.eu/publications/contemporary-history-of-alterity-in-spanish-immigration-law

10. Publication: Is Torture Part of Your Social Network?

By Tara Atluri

Atluri, Tara (2014) 'Is Torture Part of Your Social Network?', The Žižek Media Studies Reader. Ed. Matthew Flisfeder and Louis Paul Willis. Palgrave McMillan 2014.

http://www.oecumene.eu/publications/is-torture-part-of-your-social-network

12. Publication: ‘Where is the time to sleep?’ Orientalism and citizenship in Mahasweta Devi's writing

By Alessandra Marino

This article discusses the close relationship between Bengali writer Mahasweta Devi’s literary work and her activism in support of indigenous people in India, and considers the two activities as interventions in the field of law. Devi’s emphasis on the continuity between colonial and postcolonial legal frameworks invites us to look at law as a governing discourse that stigmatized Adivasis. The criminalization of indigenous people via the Criminal Tribes Act (1871) and the presumption that they belonged to a “state of nature” form part of an orientalist bias against the tribals that was legally sustained during colonialism and also through Nehru’s discourses on the modern nation. Through analysis of the short story “Operation? – Bashai Tudu”, where law appears as a non-democratic instrument for governing the poor, and using extracts from a hitherto unpublished conversation between the author and Devi, it argues that Devi’s work can be considered as a crucial analytical tool with which to explore the genealogy of Adivasi marginalization. Alessandra Marino (2014) "‘Where is the time to sleep?’ Orientalism and citizenship in Mahasweta Devi's writing", Journal of Postcolonial Writing, Volume 50, Issue 6, January 2014.

http://www.oecumene.eu/publications/%E2%80%98where-is-the-time-to-sleep%E2%80%99-orientalism-and-citizenship-in-mahasweta-devis-writing

11. Publication: Orientalism and the Politics of Contemporary Art Exhibitions

By Alessandra Marino

Alessandra Marino (2014) 'Orientalism and the Politics of Contemporary Art Exhibitions', in The Postcolonial Museum. The Arts of Memory and the Pressures of History, edited by I. Chambers, A. De Angelis, C. Ianniciello, M. Quadraro, M. Orabona. Ashgate, 2014, pp. 184-194.
 

 

Oecumene: Citizenship after Orientalism is funded by an European Research Council (ERC) Advanced Grant (Institutions, values, beliefs and behaviour ERC-AG-SH2).

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