Activism

Constructing democracy and deconstructing buildings: attempts at a different present and future in Bosnia

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By Elena Cirkovic · 12 March 2014 · 1 comment
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Bosnia’s widespread protests against unemployment and corruption, began in the formerly industrial town of Tuzla in early February, and spread quickly among other cities, eventually shutting down the center of Sarajevo. The general expression of the protests is that the average Bosnian citizens have had enough, and that the time has come for real change.

Dependent identity: The MENA, Women and Citizenship

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By Zahra Albarazi · 17 October 2011
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State sovereignty in determining nationality legislation has led to a number of difficulties worldwide, including the lack safeguards against statelessness, and often discriminatory policies.  In the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, a substantially apparent flaw in state citizenship legislation is gender discrimination. Women rarely possess the right to pass nationality on to their children or their spouse – and maternal affiliation can only be the case in extreme circumstances. This leaves the acquisition of citizenship dependent on the male figures in the family. Individuals who have often lived all their lives within the country of their mother - and cannot leave - are unable to acquire her nationality. This situation is not only impractical, it also leaves thousands of people at risk of being born stateless.

Copts' Civil Rights in Egypt: Quo Vadis?

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By Ashraf Milad · 6 July 2011
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Unlike Gypsies, Jews, Nubians, Bedouins, Shi'a or Baha'is in Egypt, Copts are not a small minority of citizens that live in a particular part of the country or use a different dialect. Copts represent, according to unofficial estimations, 10-15% of the total population in Egypt. The real number of Copts is known but treated as a military secret and is not disclosed.

Globalising statelessness

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By Laura van Waas · 23 June 2011
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At the heart of the exploration underway within the Oecumene project lies the concept of citizenship. Whether described in terms of membership or of participation, citizenship reflects some form of belonging, contributing to the drawing of dividing lines between ‘us’ and ‘them’.

Citizenship in post-referendum Sudan

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By Cynthia Morel · 19 June 2011 · 1 comment
Sudanese women

Following decades of civil war, the Comprehensive Peace Agreement of 2005 provided southern Sudanese with the opportunity to exercise their right to self-determination by way of a referendum. In January 2011, voters overwhelmingly supported the call for secession from Sudan.

Oecumene: Citizenship after Orientalism is funded by an European Research Council (ERC) Advanced Grant (Institutions, values, beliefs and behaviour ERC-AG-SH2).

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